Internet industry dating analysis

While some online dating platforms fit neatly into niches, others cast a wide net for the hearts of every single person in America.

Take Tinder, the wildly popular dating app in which users “swipe right” to note interest in someone, or “swipe left” to reject them.

According to Brooks, Tinder’s explosive popularity changed the face of internet dating with its launch in 2012.

The app grew from college campuses, Brooks says, as the company used a marketing program to entice “campus connectors” (or the “popular kids,” as he deemed them) to spread the word. “It’s such a hotbed on campuses that you can get these things to take off on campus with the right story and the right product. It’s one of the few dating apps that’s truly sharable.

Marketing minds from multiple online dating platforms, some old and some new, weigh in on how they plan to thrive with a fickle and ever-changing demographic.

In 2000, Grant Langston was asked to be a copywriter for a new startup website. He hesitated before taking it; the job was in Pasadena and he was pretty comfortable at home in Los Angeles.

He’s worked with websites like Plentyof and and has seen the industry through multiple eras, from the early days of online personals to companies scrambling for mobile relevance.

Competition has grown along with the size of the industry.

How have these marketers made a difference and created a service few ever thought they would need?

The Paris, France-based company has been rolling out slowly in the U.

S., launching in bigger cities such as New York City, Miami and Los Angeles. accounts for roughly 13%, or 1.75 million, of Happn’s user base.

Then, in 2003, the company started airing its first radio ads.

The ads featured real couples talking about how they met on e Harmony.